So let’s paint this picture. It is currently my senior year, all of my friends in my major are discussing their exciting and creative new websites, logos, PR graphic design internships, etc. and here I sit, wide-eyed, overwhelmed, having had NO graphic design experience (unless, of course, you count horribly photoshopping Tom Petty’s head over my friend’s boyfriend next to her on her 21st birthday sign). I sit down in my first class of PR Style and Design excited and ready to learn and later, I leave in tears. There are SO many tools and details of EACH Adobe Creative Suite application. Needless to say, I was overwhelmed. UNTIL a few weeks ago, I found my one (graphic design) true love: InDesign.


According to American Graphics Institute, for your understanding, “Adobe InDesign is a desktop publishing and typesetting software application produced by Adobe Systems. It can be used to create works such as posters, flyers, brochures, magazines, newspapers, presentations, books and ebooks”. I know, I know. BORING! But let me just say, this thing is AMAZING. You can do and make anything, which is super encouraging seeing as before, I had no previous Adobe Creative Cloud application experience and now, I feel like an InDesign pro!

The really cool thing about Adobe services, in general, is that they provide voice-guided videos and downloadable documents where you can actually practice the skills and follow right along as they teach you.  This is called Adobe InDesign Learn and Support. They have them for all Adobe Creative Cloud applications. This was probably my saving grace during one of the big projects due this semester: our Identity Suite. An example of my finished product is located above.


So what, you ask, is so special about InDesign? Well, let me just walk you through one of the most amazing tools I learned: The Pen Tool. This skill single handedly fixed my logo from giving me complete anxiety to complete aesthetic satisfaction. Let me break it dddddown.  


This cool tool really transformed my logo. I created my logo by using the typeface Big Caslon and colored with C: 31.6, M: 12.7, Y:0, K: 69. Here it all went down:


  1. I moved the text boxes with A and M to move and connect them vertically. However, in the first photo inserted below, you will see that the A seems slightly off, or smaller, to the letter M even though it is the same type size.

2. With the A text box selected, I then clicked the Free Transform Tool and widened the A so that the furthest serif on the left and right serifs matched up to the serifs on the top of the M.

3. As you can see in image 2 below, the left serif at the bottom of the right ascender of the A extends a bit too far over to the left. This aspect REALLY bugged me. I mean really. So I then used The Pen Tool to fix it. It takes a bit of trial and error, but after moving the anchor points around on the serif, I finally found a size I was happy with. This led me to making my own personal logo. SO proud. I absolutely love it!

4. The final product!!